Children's Services

Hampshire's Children and Young People's Plan

Priority 3:

Providing opportunities to learn, within and beyond the school day, that raise children and young people’s aspirations, encourage excellence and enable them to enjoy and achieve beyond their expectations

Key wins

Increasing the proportion of pupils eligible for free school meals who achieve five or more GCSEs grade A*-C, including English and mathematics.

Increasing the percentage of children in care achieving five or more GCSEs grade A*-C, including English and mathematics.

Achievement at school is a key determinant of future life chances. We share a responsibility to unlock the potential of every child, giving them the best possible start. Overall, Hampshire’s children and young people perform well in key assessments and exams, with results improving year on year. However, the gap between these children and young people and their disadvantaged or more vulnerable peers remains a significant issue.

There have been considerable changes in the national school system over the last two years. We now have a unique opportunity to build on our existing strong relationships, working together to improve standards and doing whatever it takes to achieve the best outcomes for our children and young people.

Collectively, we will support the most disadvantaged and vulnerable children to overcome barriers to learning, share knowledge and good practice, build on opportunities to promote resilience and develop self-esteem, and promote inclusion. Local Children’s Partnerships will continue to collaborate to identify and address local issues, promoting excellence, equality and inclusion through their actions.

Youth Support Services have been redesigned in order to meet evolving national policies, Responsibility for careers advice and guidance will transfer to schools from Local Authorities in September 2012 in accordance with legislation. Therefore, Hampshire's new Youth Support Service has three elements: Targeted youth support for the most vulnerable young people; a sold service of careers advice and guidance, that can be purchased by schools and academies; and a set of services for young people that are commissioned with a local, community focus via the Local Children's Partnerships that are open to all but with a focus on the vulnerable.

Key activity areas:

  • developing a coherent system for promoting educational excellence for all children and young people, and being intolerant of underperformance
  • building on opportunities available to promote aspiration, resilience and develop self-esteem based on the belief that all children can, and will, succeed
  • providing opportunities for children to learn how to play a musical instrument within their school setting
  • supporting early education and childcare settings to implement changes to the Early Years Foundation Stage
  • enhance early language development, literacy and social skills so that young children are ready for school
  • championing an understanding of the individual needs of vulnerable children, or those who may need extra support, including ensuring that the pupil premium is used effectively to support learning and personal development
  • understanding and implementing changes to the National Curriculum
  • strengthening teacher subject knowledge and expertise, especially in the core subjects of English and mathematics
  • developing whole system and specific school solutions to improve the attendance and attainment of children in care
  • reducing persistent absence and fixed-term exclusions
  • piloting a new assessment and single plan for children and young people with Special Educational Needs and/or disabilities
  • working together to support young people to remain in education, in line with increases in the participation age.

How has this improved since 2009:

Continued year on year improvements in key national tests

Hampshire pupils continue to excel in national tests. Overall in 2010/11 (the exams taken in summer 2011), the county’s children and young people achieved higher standards than in previous years and better than the national average. Improvements have been evidenced in Early Years Foundation Stage (age five), Key Stage 2 (age 11) and Key Stage 4 (age 16).

2007/08

2010/11

Hampshire

England average

Hampshire

England average

Acheivement at Early Years Foundation Stage

50.0%

49.0%

58.0%

59.0%

Acheivement of Level 4 in English and mathematics at Key Stage 2

74.0%

73.0%

77.0%

74.0%

Acheivement of five or more GCSE's grade A*-C, including English and mathematics

53.8%

47.6%

60.2%

58.9%

Increased proportion of good or outstanding schools

Hampshire’s schools continue to provide a good start for children and young people, with an increasing number judged good or outstanding by Ofsted. Core school improvement service resource will be focussed on assisting schools not yet judged to be good or outstanding.

Proportion judged as good or outstanding

2007/08

Last inspection judgement as at Dec 2001

Children's Centres

Not inspected

100%

Primary

67%

70%

Special

77%

70%

Secondary

58%

70%

Improved attendance

The percentage of secondary school pupils persistently absent from school fell from 6.09% in 2007/08 to 4.5% in 2009/10. Since this date, the definition of persistent absence has changed from missing 20% of all lessons to 15%, with the result that secondary pupil persistent absence increased to 8.6% during the autumn 2010/spring 2011 terms. All secondary schools have been offered additional support and advice, through network meetings and on an individual basis.

Why this is still a priority:

Attainment and attendance of children in care

Achievement of children in care in key tests is steadily improving, although the gap between them and their peers remains significant, as shown in the table below.

2008/09

2010/11

Children in care

All pupils

Gap (& points)

Children in careGap

All pupils

Gap (% points)

Percentage acheiving Level 4 or above in English at Key Stage 2

34.0%

83.0%

49

46.0%

84.0%

38

Percentage acheiving Level 4 or above in mathematics at Key Stage 2

34.0%

80.0%

46

43.0%

83.0%

40

Percentage acheiving five GCSEs grade A*-C

12.0%

77.4%

65.4

17.9%

67.2%

49.3

Percentage acheiving five GCSEs grade A*-C including English and mathematics

7.2%

53.8%

46.6

6.6%

60.2%

53.6

There is increased recognition in schools of the needs of children in care. The County Council’s virtual school, the team who focus on improving the educational achievement of children in care, works closely with schools to build capacity. A wide range of training and support networks are in place for Designated Teachers (responsible for promoting the needs of children in care in their school). Targeted reading and mathematics initiatives promoted by the County Council and teachers have been shown to accelerate pupil progress and were praised by Ofsted inspectors in their 2011 inspection. Training is also provided for carers/adoptive parents and social workers, to develop understanding of their role in supporting education.

Children in care benefit from being placed in mainly good and outstanding schools. A Personal Education Plan is in place for each child and the virtual school has a process in place to monitor the quality of the plans. They also track attendance, progress and attainment, intervening where necessary.

Gap between pupils with Special Educational Needs and their peers

Although the attainment of pupils with Special Educational Needs (SEN) has improved over recent years, the pace of improvement has not generally been in line with that of their peers, with the result that the gap between pupils has been slow to close. At Key Stage 2, the gap between SEN pupils and their peers has actually increased since 2007/08, whilst the gap at GCSE level has narrowed, as shown in the table below.

2007/08

2010/11

Percentage point difference between SEN pupils and their peers acheiving Level 4 in English and mathematics at Key Stage 2

52.7

54.0

Percentage point difference between SEN pupils and their peers acheiving five or more GCSEs grade A*-C including English and mathematics

50.6

49.9

Gap between pupils eligible for free school meals and their peers

Progress in narrowing the attainment gap between pupils eligible for free school meals and their peers has also been mixed over recent years. Whilst the gap at Key Stage 2 shows improvement, the difference at GCSE level has increased, as show in the table below.

2007/08

2010/11

Percentage point difference between free school meals pupils and their peers acheiving Level 4 in English and mathematics at Key Stage 2

26.0

25.0

Percentage point difference between pupils and their peers acheiving five or more GCSEs grade A*-C including English and mathematics

30.8

32.8

Attainment for some Black and minority ethnic groups

Although overall attainment for many BME groups has improved, there continues to be significant variation between different ethnicities. Improvements have been evidenced for Bangladeshi, Black other (mainly Fijian) and Irish. Additional focus is needed on progress for Gypsy, Roma and Traveller pupils, Black Caribbean, and Asian other (mainly Nepali speakers and Afghan asylum seekers). The proportion achieving five or more GCSEs grade A*-C, including English and mathematics is shown in the table below.

Percentage acheiving five or more GCSEs A*-C, including English and mathematics

2007/08

2010/11

Gypsy, Roma or Traveller of Irish Heritage

0.0%

25.0%

Any other White background

56.0%

67.7%

Black Caribbean

Not available - small cohort

16.7%

White/Black Caribbean

Not available - small cohort

61.5%

Black African and White/Black African

51.6%

60.9%

Any other Black background

Not available - small cohort

76.9%

Pakistani

Not available - small cohort

57.1%

Irish

Not available - small cohort

75.0%

White and Asian

76.3%

81.7%

Any other mixed

58.1%

63.6%

Indian

77.8%

73.1%

Bangladeshi

Not available - small cohort

68.0%

Other Asian background

39.9%

42.2%

Chinese

77.8%

78.1%

Any other ethnic group

46.7%

50.0%

The County Council’s Ethnic Minority and Traveller Achievement Service works closely with schools and other services to improve educational outcomes for vulnerable BME and Traveller pupils.