Children's Services

Hampshire's Children and Young People's Plan

What’s important to children and young people

Hampshire Children’s Trust has a variety of mechanisms for capturing the views of local children and young people to inform the planning and review of services. This includes: annual surveys of school pupils, specific consultation exercises on priorities/policies, feedback from Hampshire County Youth Conference, surveys of children in care and care leavers, and regular discussion between children in care and their peer representatives, the Care Ambassadors. This section of the Plan sets out their thoughts and feelings on each of the priorities.

Priority 1: Addressing the incidence and reducing the impact of poverty on the achievements and life chances of children and young people

Hampshire County Youth Conference agreed with this priority, saying “no one wants to be poor” and “everybody should have the same chances”(1).

Between a quarter and a third of school pupils say they worry about money (23.3% of Year 8 students and 30.8% of Year 10 students) (2).

Priority 2: Securing children and young people’s physical, spiritual, social, emotional and mental health, promoting healthy lifestyles and reducing inequalities

School pupils say they would like more information and advice on:

  • Alcohol – 15.1% of Year 6 pupils and 15.7% of Year 7 pupils want more/better information and advice, and 15.3% (Year 6) and 16.5% (Year 7) said they had not received any information or advice (3).
  • Sex and relationships – 17.5% of Year 7 pupils (3) want more/better information and advice, 16.9% said they had not received any information or advice, and 4.3% did not know where to get advice. 15.7% of Year 8 pupils and 17.5% of Year 10 pupils(2) worry about girlfriends/boyfriends/sex.
  • Healthy eating – 29.9% of Year 9 pupils (3) want more/better information and advice,13.7% said they had not received any information or advice, and 4.7% did not know where to get advice.

“Services need to offer opportunities that will encourage young people to have a healthy lifestyle.” (1)

“Being healthy is being happy.” (1)

Priority 3: Providing opportunities to learn, within and beyond the school day, that raise children and young people’s aspirations, encourage excellence and enable them to enjoy and achieve beyond their expectations

Young people at the Hampshire County Youth Conference felt this priority was important because "achieving makes you feel good” and children and young people should be "supported and encouraged to do whatever they want to do”(1).

Between a quarter and a third of pupils worry about school work (24.0% of Year 8 pupils and 35.5% of Year 10 pupils). Worries about exams are significantly higher among Year 10 pupils (34.4% of Year 8 pupils and 53.5% of Year 10 pupils)(2).

The children in care who participated in a recent survey are positive about their time at school, with 83% reporting that they get all, or most, of the help they need with their education(4).

Priority 4: Ensuring that children and young people are safe and feel safe

The most important safeguarding issues have been ranked by young people (5) as:

1. children living with domestic abuse

2. children who self-harm

3. young people involved in crime

4. children who abuse others

5. missing children

6. young people involved in drugs and alcohol, and children living with drugs and alcohol

7. bullying

The proportion of school pupils who worry about being bullied or getting into trouble is relatively low (20.6% of Year 8 and 12.3% of Year 10 pupils worry about being bullied, while 17.1% of Year 8 and 11.4% of Year 10 pupils worry about getting into trouble). A number of pupils say that their area would be a better place to live if it was safer, or there was less crime (24.4% of Year 8 and 20.4% of Year 10 pupils)(2).

"There needs to be more awareness raising activities on personal safety and security.”(1)

Priority 5: Promoting vocational, leisure and recreational activities that provide opportunities for children and young people to experience success and make a positive contribution

School pupils say they would like more information and advice on careers – 17.7% of Year 7 pupils and 27.9% of Year 9 pupils want more/better information and advice, 23.6% (Year 7) and 12.1% (Year 9) said they had not received any information or advice, and 5.0% (Year 7) and 3.7% (Year 9) did not know where to get advice (3).

A significant proportion of pupils are worried about their future (36.8% of Year 8 pupils and 42.8% of Year 10 pupils)(2).

The majority of pupils feel that children and young people’s views "are not listened to very much” (51.5% of Year 8 pupils and 58.3% of Year 10 pupils)(2).

When surveyed, a number of children in care had not heard about the ways they could have their say, or seen the Pledge for Children in Care (73% had not heard of a special group or meeting for children in care, eg: the Care Council, and 71% had not seen the Pledge). However, 73% said their opinions usually or always make a difference to how they get looked after(4).

"Raise awareness of the good that young people achieve.”(1)

Around a third of school pupils think more or better sports clubs/centres would make their area a better place to live (30.8% of Year 8 pupils and 31.0% of Year 10 pupils). A similar proportion say that more or better activities for children and young people and/or more or better parks and green spaces would make their area a better place to live (30.0% of Year 8 and 31.7% of Year 10 pupils/37.6% of Year 8 and 33.6% of Year 10 pupils)(2). A smaller proportion think better public transport would improve where they live (16.5% of Year 8 pupils and 24.8% of Year 10 pupils)(4).

The majority of children in care (80%) said they had a good choice of hobbies and activities(4).

"To be able to have free time and enjoy things without pressure.”(1)

"Fun and play is important.”(1)

Sources:

  1. Hampshire County Youth Conference discussion on CYPP priorities, 2012
  2. Well-being Survey 2010: a total of 10,016 Years 8 (age 12 or 13) and 10 (age 14 or 15) pupils participated in this survey.
  3. Pupil Attitude Survey 2011: a total of 43,936 Hampshire pupils from Years 2 (age six or seven), 6 (age 10 or 11), 7 (age 11 or 12) and 9 (age 13 or 14) participated in this survey.
  4. Care4me Survey 2011: a total of 103 children in care participated in this survey.