Equality Impact Assessment

Overview:

Assessment Name: progressing the strategy for carers
Department: Adult Services Date Created: 29/03/2011 15:00:41
Lead Author: Dominique Rawlings Lead ID: sshqlddr
Additional Authors (if applicable): Glen Garrod
Edward Walton
 
 
 
Aims and Objectives: This report addresses both structural deficits in the way Adult Services works with carers and, the development of services to carers
Main Activities: • extend and clarify the policy context in which services are provided in the form of a more robust assessment framework for operational staff working with carers

• further clarify those services intended for carers and for which no contribution would be sought.

• budget analysis (the ‘Carers Balance Sheet’).

• Commissioning of an enhanced ‘Take a Break’ service

Who's intended to benefit: Carers and service users (as indirect beneficiaries)

Summary of Report:

Summary of Main Findings: This service development targets a relatively disadvantaged group with a view to promoting social inclusion and addressing barriers to accessing services and support that could potentially meet needs. Carers represent a cross section of the community although the majority of carers are aged between 45 and 54 years.

Older carers provide a higher percentage of care hours and carers known to Adult Service Department are likely to be providing significantly more hours of care per week.

There is an increasing number of younger carers, with younger families, especially in the mental health group whose needs are not currently met.

Higher rates of long-term conditions and morbidity in some sections of the minority ethnic population are likely to shape both the prevalence and nature of care-giving, and the carer’s response (Nazroo, 1997). A 2010 Afiya Trust survey revealed that carers from BME groups who support older parents who do not speak the language or have different cultural traditions face additional barriers in accessing acceptable support for the person they care for. This means that often they end up relying inappropriately on other family members for help or have to give up work. This puts additional and unacceptable burdens on BME carers which other carers do not have to face. There is also an additional number of carers from BME background who support both an elderly relative and a younger disabled family member.

Developing personalised options for Carer replacement solutions can help address these issues

Of all carers, it is reported that 58% are women and 42% are men. (National Census Data).

The service development outlines the commissioning intentions for high quality, accessible personalised support services, an action which has been requested by carers via consultation.

Further actions will be taken to ensure equality of access: Carers support workers and community development officers will support signposting to carer services amongst BME carers. Contract monitoring officers will ensure compliance to specifications and obtain data on access, particularly related to communication and gender of carers. This will improve data quality and support service uptake

Age:

What do you know about the breakdown of people who use your services compared to the community profile: • On going work to identify needs of young carers and establish joint working protocol with CS

• National evidence that 75% of young carers care for an adult

• Carers represent a cross section of the community although the majority of carers are aged between 45 and 54 years.

• Older carers provide a higher percentage of care hours and carers known to Adult Service Department are likely to be providing significantly more hours of care per week.

• Local evidence of families with younger parents – with young children, where one parent is affected by mental health issues

• 26% of 18-20 year old have opted for direct payment compared to 4% for 41-50 and 2% for 51-64

• Local evidence of middle aged people with learning disability living with increasingly older carers

Will some people be able to use or benefit from the service: • A 2010 Afiya Trust survey revealed that carers from BME groups who support older parents who do not speak the language or have different cultural traditions face additional barriers in accessing acceptable support for the person they care for. This means that often they end up relying inappropriately on other family members for help or have to give up work

• Older carers from BME groups less likely to speak and understand English well

How could the iniative improve equality of access: • With TAB enhanced, replacement carers will be able to work with families to support childcare routines

• Providers required (see specifications) to work in personalised way and adopt a proactive attitude towards needs associated with culture and faith

• TAB enhanced can be accessed via a simple voucher system or a direct payment

• Paper aims to clarify services available to carers so that they are accessed by all teams in all care groups

• Variety of providers used across the county

Disabled People:

What do you know about the breakdown of people who use your services compared to the community profile: • Gaps in data

• National data shows that an increasing number of people with complex needs are surviving to adulthood so parents are carers for longer or service user become carers themselves for older parents.

• TAB scorecard shows that a majority of services to carers are provided to carers of older people. There is lower take up for LD, MH and young carers

Will some people be able to use or benefit from the service: No, additional guidance to staff and new service will address gaps and increase access
How could the iniative improve equality of access: • New service provision will focus on developing services for this group. Person centred response that promotes social integration

• More information will be collected from providers to work effectively with this group (see specs

Faith:

What do you know about the breakdown of people who use your services compared to the community profile: • Data on faith collected on swift inconsistently and for service users rather than carer
Will some people be able to use or benefit from the service: • Potentially, needs linked to faith (fasting, dress code, death rituals) ignored at carers assessment
How could the iniative improve equality of access: • Paper recommends that providers adopt a proactive attitude to support needs linked to faith. Monitored through contract monitoring

Gender:

What do you know about the breakdown of people who use your services compared to the community profile: • National figure report that 58% are women and 42% are men

• Hampshire Swift system only allows analysis of numbers by SU gender, not carer

No data available for transgender

Will some people be able to use or benefit from the service: • Carers in some established BME groups tend to be female and are less likely to speak and understand English (see below)

• Men are less likely to identify themselves in a caring role

How could the iniative improve equality of access: • Paper recommends that providers adopt a proactive attitude to support needs linked to faith. Monitored through contract monitoring

Race:

What do you know about the breakdown of people who use your services compared to the community profile: • Nationally data show that Higher rates of long-term conditions and morbidity in some sections of the minority ethnic population are likely to shape both the prevalence and nature of care-giving, and the carer’s response (Nazroo, 1997)

• Local research and data show that Hampshire BME population has increased. Diversity of origin has also increased (100+ languages spoken)

• Travellers is one of the biggest minority group in Hampshire: local evidence of higher incidence of LD within this group

• The number of people with learning disabilities from BME groups getting a service from HCC has not increased and is below that expected given the local population make up, particularly for the Asian population

• 22 ethnic minority carers received a service out of 1609 total. This is only 1.36% and is well below what would be expected as the BME population for Hamsphire is estimated at 8% of the total population

“Failure to communicate effectively can create a vacuum in accurate knowledge about service users. This can result in professionals falling back on stereotypes and assumptions that compromise the quality and effectiveness of services provided. Service users can perceive poor communication as an apparent disinterest in their welfare, leading to mistrust of both the service and the provider” (Katbamna et al, 2000, Mir & Din, 2003)

Will some people be able to use or benefit from the service: • People from BME groups are not accessing support services.

• Work on this issue indicates that this is due to:

- a lack of information and awareness

- a lack of understanding of the role of different professionals and requests procedures

- Difference in services on offer compared to country of origin

- Stigmas attached to learning disabilities in some cultures

- Attitude to officialdom: lack of willingness to challenge and chase officials (HCC workers)

- lack of or limited English language skills

How could the iniative improve equality of access: Community engagement officers to work with communities to raise awareness and information on availability of carers support

• Information targeted at BME carers groups

• Information available in a range of format and languages

• Providers required to work proactively to engage with minority groups and support needs associated with culture via new service specification

• Interpreters and translators will be used where critical to ensure the right support package is put in place

• Carers support workers to positively promote opportunities that will help people access support

Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual:

What do you know about the breakdown of people who use your services compared to the community profile: No data
Will some people be able to use or benefit from the service: no
How could the iniative improve equality of access: Compliance will be ensured through contract monitoring and service specs

Socio Economic Factors:

What do you know about the breakdown of people who use your services compared to the community profile: • National evidence show that families with a disabled member are more likely to experience economic hardship

• Where family members are disabled (either adults or children) average (median) incomes are reduced and in particular the chances of having a high income are much reduced. (Mc Kay & Atkinson, 2007)

• Local evidence of economic deprivation amongst housed travellers (Travellers bus research 2007)

Will some people be able to use or benefit from the service: No as services for carers are free of charge

Definition of a carer service allows for a limited transport element

How could the iniative improve equality of access: • Guidance related to carers assessment to reinforce need to make assessment that take into account carers’ careers and desire to work

• Aim of Tab enhanced is to support carers to maintain employment

Rural Isolation:

What do you know about the breakdown of people who use your services compared to the community profile: no
Will some people be able to use or benefit from the service: no
How could the iniative improve equality of access: service available in all areas

Other groups affected:

Are there other groups affected not already mentioned: no

Conclusions of Potential Impact:

Possible Impact: BME carers are unaware of services

Interpreters and translators must be used effectively for BME groups to benefit from this strategy

Men carers less likely to access service

If any groups are disadvantaged is this likely to be unlawful: no
Group Affected: BME carers

male carers

Evidence: Number of BME carers currently receiving a service

Feedback from a BME carers workshop (feb 2010)

Number of BME carers currently receiving a service

Feedback from a BME carers workshop( Feb 2010)

Number of identified carers

Further Actions to be taken:

Action: Signposting to carer services

Monitor through contract monitoring

Monitor take up through providers

Responsibility: Community development officers

Contract monitoring

Carer support workers

Timescale: April 2012
Expected Outcomes: Improved equality of access

Better data quality

Improved uptake

Review Summary:

Review Update:  
Review Date: 29/04/2012 Date sent to Web Editor: 19/04/2011 15:20:48