Hampshire Cultural Trust

Vertebrate collection

The collection contains isolated teeth and bones collected from both the marine and terrestrial deposits of the Quaternary, Paleogene and Cretaceous periods of Hampshire and the Isle of Wight. No articulated specimens are present in these collections. A small percentage of the specimens provide valuable data on tooth and skeletal association. No type specimens are present but certain individual specimens provide new or previously unrecorded information on species ecology, pathology, range, distribution and preservation.

  • Molar Mammuthus

    Quaternary vertebrates
    Vertebrate remains are not common in the Quaternary sediments of Hampshire. Marine vertebrate faunas are rare but when present are represented by fossil fish remains. Fossil mammals dominate the terrestrial vertebrate fauna.

    Photo: Molar tooth of mammoth (Mammuthus species?)

     

  • Dentition Myliobatis

    Paleogene vertebrates
    Vertebrates remains are not common in the Paleogene sediments of Hampshire. Fossil fish remains, particularly individual fish otoliths and the teeth of sharks and rays, are the most frequently found of the marine vertebrate fossils. Terrestrial vertebrate faunas are dominated by fossil mammals and reptiles, particularly crocodiles.

    Photo: Teeth of eagle ray (Myliobatis species)

     

  • Vertebra Iguanodon

    Cretaceous vertebrates
    Vertebrates remains are not common in the Cretaceous sediments of Hampshire. Fossil fish remains, particularly individual teeth of sharks and rays, are the most frequently found of the marine vertebrate fossils. Disarticulated remains of fossil reptiles, including dinosaurs, dominate terrestrial vertebrate faunas.

    Photo: Vertebra of Iguanodon

     

 
Paleogene Sharks teeth
Paleogene Sharks teeth