Heritage100

Soda Stall

Soda pump

...pushed along unmade roads to local fetes where fizzy drinks and ice cream would be sold.

This elegant soda stall was purchased by William Grenham in 1929 for £106 12s 6d for use at Grenham’s Tearooms in Aldershot Rd, Church Crookham, Hampshire. It was bought from Wilson’s Soda Fountains (1921) Ltd in Accrington and was supplied with a freezer and a 14 lb tube of CO2 gas.

It consists of a wooden cabinet mounted on four small wheels with a brass bar mounted on the top edge to push it along. There is a marble topped box soda machine with four soda flavour dispensers (orange, raspberry, lemon, cream soda), two nozzles for adding the CO2 gas to make up the soda and a freezer for storing ice cream.

The stall was used by Mr Grenham’s wife Clara who ran the Tearooms. It would often be pushed along unmade roads to local fetes where fizzy drinks and ice cream would be sold. One such location was the field beside the village hall opposite the Wyvern Inn in Church Crookham. The ice cream would probably have been shaped in a mould and placed between two wafer biscuits as the traditional ‘pennylicks’ had been banned in 1926.

Quick Facts

  • Purchased in 1929
  • Purchase price £106 12s 6d
  • Made of wood, brass and marble
  • Used at Grenham’s Tearooms, Aldershot Rd, Church Crookham, Hampshire
  • Made by Wilson’s Soda Fountains (1921) Ltd
  • Made in Accrington, Lancashire
  • Accession number SH2005.85

Facts

  • Soda water is water into which carbon dioxide has been dissolved under pressure to make it fizzy. The process was discovered in the 18th century and became increasingly popular through the 19th century especially when mixed with fruit syrups; or with ginger to make ginger beer. Soda making machines, also known as soda fountains, were developed in the 19th century and became popular from the 1890s to the 1950s.

Did you know?

In the 19th century if you bought ice cream from a street trader it would probably have been served in a small glass dish and cost a penny. This was called ‘penny lick. They were very unhygienic because often the glasses were only given a quick wipe before another customer used them and were eventually banned in 1926.

Gallery

Soda Stall
Soda flavours
Soda flavours

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