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Hampshire Museums

What are we remembering on Remembrance Day?

A 1 ½ hour session for one class of KS1, led by an Interpreter-Demonstrator

We request a minimum of 4 adults to support this session

This session supports QCA History Unit 17 and the Citizenship curriculum

Organisation

During the session you will need to divide into 4 groups to move around activities. Each group will be led by an adult helper and our Interpreter-Demonstrator will facilitate the session. It’s helpful for the Interpreter-Demonstrator if pupils are wearing name stickers

Session objectives

By means of hands-on activities pupils will explore how we remember and commemorate events that affect many people.

Outline

Introduction

Welcome to Aldershot Military Museum, introduction to the museum and the session.

The Interpreter-Demonstrator will lead a discussion about remembering and read Badger’s Parting Gifts by Susan Varley. It’s very helpful but not essential if you have read this in school.

Working in 4 groups, pupils will move around the following 15 min activities:

Symbols

Work as a team to discover the story behind why many people wear a red poppy on Remembrance Day. Look at other symbols of remembrance, discuss what Badger’s friends could use to remember him and create a woodland-themed wreath.

Showing We Remember

Discuss the things we have that are around our towns and villages all the time that show we remember people no longer with us – gravestones, benches dedicated to people, public memorials and books of remembrance - by looking at photographs. Work together to design a memorial for Badger.

Explore Badger’s Parting Gifts

Recap the story and explore some of the memories Badger’s friends are left using a hands-on matching activity. Discuss what we have at home that is important to us to help us to remember people and events. Explore some museum objects linked to mourning and remembrance.

Remembering Together

Discuss the different ways we remember with other people – processions, silences, special music. What other ways do we know? Listen to some clips of music and decide if they’re for remembrance or for happier times

Conclusion

Class comes back together for a short recap of what they’ve learned.

We would be very grateful if you could complete and return the evaluation form you are given on arrival at your earliest convenience

 

You will shortly be visiting Aldershot Military Museum for 1½ hours to support the delivery of a session called What are we remembering on Remembrance Day? This session has been devised and developed especially for Key Stage 1 pupils. Pupils may have already read Susan Varley’s book Badger’s Parting Gifts in school as preparation for their visit. You will be leading a small group of pupils as they try a range of activities in the museum; an Interpreter-Demonstrator will oversee the session and support you.

On arrival the Interpreter-Demonstrator will meet you and introduce you to the museum and give you a brief introduction to the activities you will be involved in and may read Badger’s Parting Gifts, if necessary. The activities all have a brief instruction sheet with them.

There are 4 activities

Symbols

Work as a team to discover the story behind why many people wear a red poppy on Remembrance Day. Look at other symbols of remembrance, discuss what Badger’s friends could use to remember him and create a woodland-themed wreath.

Showing We Remember

Discuss the things we have that are around our towns and villages all the time that show we remember people no longer with us – gravestones, benches dedicated to people, public memorials and books of remembrance - by looking at photographs. Work together to design a memorial for Badger.

Explore Badger’s Parting Gifts

Recap the story and explore some of the memories Badger’s friends are left using a hands-on matching activity. Discuss what we have at home that is important to us to help us to remember people and events. Explore some museum objects linked to mourning and remembrance.

Remembering Together

Discuss the different ways we remember with other people – processions, silences, special music. What other ways do we know? Listen to some clips of music and decide if they’re for remembrance or for happier times.

Before you begin any activities, the Interpreter-Demonstrator will explain the handling rules to everyone. These rules are for pupils and adults alike; you will be handing a range of items from Hampshire County Council Museums’ collections and we politely request that you remember our handling rules and respect our collections at all times.

At the end of the session, the Interpreter-Demonstrator will gather the class.

 

Pre-Visit

Discuss what special days there are each year (birthdays, wedding anniversaries, religious celebrations, Bank Holidays) and then discuss which ones are for one person, which are for a family and which are for lots of people all over. This will help with the idea of annual events, and also with some events being only for those around us, while others are for lots and lots of people.

Post-Visit

Imagine you are arranging a special Remembrance Assembly at school. How will you explain to everyone what Remembrance Day is about? Think about what tools you could use: poems, pictures, red poppies.

Look at your local war memorial and discuss the names on it – do you recognise any of the last names? – and how many people are on it. What would it have been like for your community to lose those people?

www.britishlegion.org.uk has resources for schools relating to remembrance; also links to other relevant sites.

We were there is an award-winning website based on the MOD’s touring exhibition which pays tribute to the contribution made by military and civilian personnel from what was the British Empire and later the Commonwealth and whose descendants are now part of the diverse population of the UK.

 
 

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