Hampshire Printing Services

Help, advice and technical information

Glossary

Bleed

If any images or type are intended to run of the edge of the page (known as bleed) you must allow for this in your document. A typical example of an image requiring bleed is the Hampshire County Council logo when used in a band at the foot of a page. A minimum bleed of 3mm is required, failure to do this will mean your document may be supplied with a white margin or the document may be trimmed a few millimetres undersize.

CRC - Camera ready copy

This term is used when hard copy masters are used to print directly from.

CMYK - Cyan, magenta, yellow and black

These are the four basic ink colours used to litho print documents containing colour images (photographs). They are often referred to as ‘the four colour process’.

DPI - Dots per inch

Used when referring to the printing resolution of an image.

Hard copy

Always supply a colour print out of each page, in order that we can be sure that your artwork looks the same on our system as it did on yours.

PDF - Portable Document Format

This is a computer file format that can be viewed on any computer with ‘Acrobat Reader’ installed. Acrobat Reader is distributed free and has become a popular way of exchanging files. Once converted to PDF the recipient of a PDF can view and print the PDF in exactly the same way as the originator of the artwork but is unable to make any changes to the document. If you should need to create a PDF, you will need to purchase a copy of Acrobat Distiller.

PPI - Pixels per inch

Used when referring to the screen resolution of an image.

Resolution

The resolution of artwork depends upon the output device. A digital colour copier will have a resolution of 600dpi where as a printing press requires 2400dpi. All photographs or bitmapped images should have a resolution of approximately 300ppi at the size they are to be used. If a lower resolution is used, the images may look pixilated, the lower the resolution the worse the effect will be. Supplying files with greater resolution will not impact on quality but will simply increase the file size making them harder to email or take longer for your desktop printer to output.

RGB - Red, green and blue

These are the three colours that all digital cameras, desktop scanners and monitors use to handle colour.

Separations

In order to litho print any artwork, the artwork is required to be ‘colour separated’ in order to produce a printing plate for each colour. If more than four colours are present, it is more cost effective to use the four process colours. When printing to a desktop laser or inkjet printer, your artwork would normally print as a ‘composite’ image.

 

Creating artwork

If you wish to supply finished artwork for litho printing, you should be aware of some basic print knowledge. Taking note of the following pointers may help in avoiding costly adjustments to your artwork, by the printer.

Colour

Keep in mind that every colour you use in your document will require a printing plate to be made. If more than three colours are used, the document will usually be converted by the printer to use the four process printing colours; cyan, magenta, yellow and black (CMYK). The amount of printing plates used are significant in the costing of a print job. If your work contains colour photographs it will need to be printed in CMYK, so using colour elsewhere in your document, perhaps for text or backgrounds, should not impact on cost.

Colour photographs (CMYK)

If you are using colour photographs, they should be converted to the CMYK colour mode before inserting them into your document. Be aware that most digital cameras and scanners save picture files as RGB colour mode. To convert images to CMYK you will need a software package such as Adobe Photoshop. If you have no option but to use RGB images they will look dull and flat when printed on a press.

Resolution

All photographs or bitmapped images should have a resolution of approximately 300ppi (pixels per inch) at the size they are to be used. If a lower resolution is used, the images may look pixilated, the lower the resolution the worse the effect will be.

Supplying files with greater resolution will not impact on quality but will simply increase the file size making them harder to e-mail or take longer for your desktop printer to output.

Bleed

If any images or type are intended to run off the edge of the page (known as bleed) you must allow for this in your document. A typical example of an image requiring bleed is the Hampshire County Council logo when used in a band at the foot of a page. A minimum bleed of 3mm is required, failure to do this will mean your document may be supplied with a white margin or the document may be trimmed a few millimetres undersize.

Fonts

Always supply any fonts used in your document, especially any unusual ones, as we may well not have them on our system. When a font is missing it will be substituted with another and may cause the text in your document to re-flow and make it look quite different. Note that IT2000 is not able to output to litho plate and therefore Publisher files are printed from PC’s that do not have access to the IT2000 fonts.

Separations

If your software allows ‘separations’ to be output to your desktop printer, it is well worth doing so to ensure you have only used the colours intended. Any extra colours remaining in the file, once supplied for litho printing may incur an extra charge for ‘troubleshooting’ this type of problem.

Hard copy

Always supply a colour print out of each page, in order that we can be sure that your artwork looks the same on our system as it did on yours.

How to supply artwork to HPS for printing

The majority of artwork today is in a digital format and can be received in any of the following ways:

Email

Please send your files to: hps@hants.gov.uk The maximum file size that can be received is 20mb.

Some file formats can become corrupted by the e-mail system.
Known problem files are; QuarkXPress, Freehand and some font files.
To avoid this use compression software such as ZIP (PC) or Stuffit (Mac) otherwise it is best to supply files on disc.

Please quote any HPS reference numbers such as an estimate or job number and the name of the person that has been dealing with your project (if you know). Also, please send a hard copy of your artwork in the post.

CD ROM and DVD

We can work from CD’s or DVD’s formatted for either PC, Mac or both. Please label the disc with the name of the job, who it is for and what software has been used to originate the main document.

Also, please supply a hard copy print-out of your document with the disc.

Other digital media

In addition to CD ROMs we can also read; ZIP disks, DVD data disks and floppy disc.

IT2000

If you are an IT2000 user (Hantsnet) you can copy files to a shared folder on the I-Drive. The folder is called Hampshire Printing Services and can be found by navigating through:
Common on ‘Data2’
(I:) > Shared > Hampshire Printing Services.

If your document contains more than one file, please create and name a folder to put all your files in. Be aware that files left here will be available to all users of Hantsnet. HPS will archive the file(s) to our server and delete the file from IT2000 after the job is printed.

 

PANTONE® colour

PANTONE* colour is sometimes called PMS colours (Pantone Matching System) are pre-mixed inks that can been chosen by the client from a colour swatch and matched on press.

When to use PANTONE Colour

PANTONE Colour is ideal when only one, two or three defined colours are required. It can easily be matched if the job should need to be re-printed at a later date.

PANTONE colour in DTP applications:

Professional DTP applications contain PANTONE colour libraries that allow the user to colour their artwork accordingly, giving greater control to the user and the printer.

PANTONE and CMYK

Professional software allows PANTONE colour to be converted in to the four process colours (CMYK). This will always be necessary when colour photographs are in your document but may also occur if your file contains more than three PANTONE colours. Converting PANTONE colour in this way will change the expected results slightly and will impact on brighter colours more than others.

 

Macintosh Software supported by HPS

Macintosh is the preferred platform for creating artwork as it is considered to be the industry standard. Our graphics staff are skilled in all major DTP applications.

Supported applications

  • QuarkXPress
  • InDesign CS
  • PhotoShop CS
  • Illustrator CS
  • Acrobat Professional
  • Stuffit Deluxe
  • Suitcase
  • Fusion

 

Working with MS Word

Word is an ideal package for printing locally on your desktop laser or on a high volume colour copier but beware; it is not recognised by commercial printers as a professional package for print output.

If you intend submitting Word files to your printer, talk to the printer first to avoid spending hours compiling a document that cannot be printed as intended.

Black and white or colour?

Documents that require printing in one ink colour should not be a problem especially if the document has been coloured in black. If you should want the document to print in any other (single) colour, for example blue, it is more practical and will achieve a better result if all the elements within the document are coloured black. We simply generate printing plates for the document and use a blue ink on press.

Printing a Word file in two or more colours is the most difficult option to achieve and should be avoided.

Professional software that allows ‘colour separation’ is a must for this type of job. If you have already compiled your Word file, then talk to us as there are ways around this but there may be cost or quality issue if we proceed.

Word files containing colour photographs or clip art can be printed but is not advisable if quality is important. Colour images will certainly print looking flat and dull due to Word’s inability to print using the four standard colours used in commercial printing (cyan, magenta, yellow and black). If a quality colour reproduction is required, the artwork must be created using a professional DTP package such as QuarXPress or InDesign.

Bleed

Images or text that runs off the edge of the page is know as bleed. A typical example of an image requiring bleed is the Hampshire County Council logo when used in a solid band at the foot of a page. However, Word does not allow bleed to be used and therefore will cause your document to be supplied with a white margin or perhaps the document will be trimmed a few millimetres undersize.

For this reason it is best to avoid introducing any elements that bleed off the page when using Word.

Working with Word files for litho printing

Fonts

Always supply any unusual fonts used in your document, as we may well not have them on our system. When a font is missing it will be substituted with another and may cause your document to look quite different. Note that IT2000 is notable to output to litho printing plates and therefore Word files are printed from PC’s that do not have access to the IT2000 fonts.

Page Numbers

If using page numbers in your document, remember that a printed leaflet or book will have left and right pages and look better if the numbers are set accordingly. It is usual to have even page numbers on the left and odd page numbers on the right.

Hard copy

Always supply a colour print-out of each page, in order that we can be sure that your artwork looks the same on our system as it did on yours.

Further information in using Word is available from http://hantsnet2000.hants.gov.uk/learnit/word/index.html

 
 
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